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Under A Fairy Moon

Winner of the Gelett Burgess Children’s Book Award 2012 (fantasy) and the Canadian Christian Writing Awards 2012 (Young Adult) …. Addy Marten sets out to explore her new neighbor’s beautiful garden, and especially the rows of mysterious stone statues that she has glimpsed through her bedroom window. Instead of the enticing hideaway she has imagined, however, she finds herself trapped in the Median Realms, and an unwilling pawn in a game of Fairy Chess. She must use all her courage and wits to win the game and free herself from malicious fairy creatures and their twisted fairy-tale world. — “A misbehaving pixie named Enitua steals the limelight as the novel’s most precocious character and later becomes a key ally in guarding the human’s safety.” — Publishers Weekly Reviewer (Amazon Breakthrough Novel Awards, 2010) ABOUT THE AUTHOR T. M. Wallace lives in Ontario, Canada with her husband and four children. T. M. Wallace received her Master’s degree in English Literature from Carleton University and a degree in Education from the University of Ottawa. In 2012 her book, “Under A Fairy Moon,” won the Gelett Burgess Children’s Book Award for Fantasy and the Canadian Christian Writing Award for Young Adult fiction. Read more…

Glenn Gould: Sketches of Solitude

In his introduction to this superb anthology, McKibben (The End of Nature) proposes that environmental writing is Americas most distinctive contribution to the worlds literature. The collected pieces amply prove the point. Read more…

Wintergarden

W. W. Norton is pleased to announce that The Norton Book of Nature Writing is now available in a paperback college edition. The definitive anthology of nature writing in English, this book has been significantly expanded and is now accompanied by a field guide of valuable resources for both teachers and students. A picture tells a thousand stories, but the one it doesnt tell is how the shot was made. Barbara London and John Uptons Photography is an all inclusive look at the craft of photography. Read more…

The Boy Who Swallowed a Fish

Natural History is, as it claims a visual guide, perhaps not the ultimate, but close and not everything almost. Its chapter on fish seems a little lean, but most will not notice. It is a big heavy, over 7 pounds, coffee table book. It does have some stunning pictures and lots of colored illustrations. Most of what it includes are sections on each page with coloured charts, pictures, and illustrations of many elements of the natural world rocks, ferns, a variety of snails, birds of prey it is filled with almost any living thing you could think of. The maps are well done and it will do much to clear up any confusion one has on classifications. Read more…